Archive for #sicklit

Booktalk: Invincible by Amy Reed

Invincible cover

Are you and your teens looking for #sicklit books?  Are you looking for books that are filled with happiness and sadness and sickness and romance and dashed hopes?  Would you like to read one of my top tearjerker contenders of 2015?  Well, check out Invincible by Amy Reed, and get ready to be crushed by ALL THE FEELS.

Seriously, though.  This book made me cry so much that it was embarrassing.

Enjoy!!!

BOOKTALK:

Evie knows that her days are numbered.  She has to deal with the cold hard fact that she’s living in the cancer ward, that she’s NEVER going to get better, and that she’s nearing the end of her life.  She’s growing apart from the people she used to know, and the girl she used to be.  As each day passes, she’s pulling further and further away from her friends, her boyfriend, and even her family.  Because she isn’t that pretty, popular, loving girl anymore.  She’s not the Evie that they used to know.  Now she’s a different girl altogether, a girl who hangs out with other sick kids like Caleb and Stella in the cancer ward.  Now she’s a girl who’s waiting to die, or a girl who’s waiting to see which of her friends die first.

But here’s the thing — Evie doesn’t die after all.  She gets better.  On the one hand that seems like the best news in the world.  But on the other hand … it isn’t.  Because Evie already spent a huge part of her life saying goodbye to everyone who used to be important to her.  The more time passes, Evie is going to realize that she’s not the same person she used to be.  And that living can be even harder than dying.

Evie gets her life back.  But what kind of life is she going to have?  And what kind of person is she going to be?

Boooktalk: Faceless by Alyssa Sheinmel

Faceless cover

I must confess that when I first picked up a copy of Faceless by Alyssa Sheinmel and read what it was about, I moved it to the bottom of my reading pile.  I honestly didn’t know when (if ever) I would be able to emotionally handle the story of a girl whose face is burned away in a freak accident.  I mean, I like #sicklit as much as the next person, but the whole concept just seemed too gruesome for me.

When I did read it, though, I discovered that the story was moving and painful without being overly explicit.  It focused more on Maisie’s identity, who she thinks she is, who she wants to be, and who she CAN be.  This is sure to be a hit with #sicklit fans and teens who enjoy survivor stories.  I think that it would also make a great topic for a book discussion, because this is a book about characters who go through different emotional struggles and make sometimes questionable decisions along the way.

BOOKTALK:

When Maisie wakes up in the hospital, she doesn’t remember what happened to her.  She doesn’t understand why she can’t move, or why her body feels different.  All she knows is, based on how much her mother has been crying and the look on her father’s face, whatever happened to her must have been REALLY bad.

This is the story of a girl who used to have a normal, happy life.  She was a good student, she was a runner, and she had a wonderful boyfriend who asked her to the junior prom.

This is the story of a girl who went out for a run one morning, and on the way back home she was injured in a freak accident when an electrical wire fell on her during a storm.

This is the story of a girl whose body was so badly damaged by that accident that she will need a face transplant to replace the part of her that was burned away.

This is the story of a girl who realizes that her life will never be normal again.

Booktalk: Placebo Junkies by J.C. Carleson

Placebo Junkies cover

Placebo Junkies by J.C. Carleson is … mind expanding?  Yes.  Mind-altering?  Yes.  It’s also one of my favorite YA books of the year.  It’s hard to describe without giving too much away, but the best I can tell you for now is that it seems like realistic fiction but then again it might not be, depending on whose point of view and whose reality you’re talking about.  Seriously, though, this is a book you’ll want to read and then read again to see what you might have missed the first time around.

BOOKTALK:

May cause vomiting.  May cause depression.  May cause death.

That’s what it says on the labels of the pills that Audie takes.  You see, Audie is part of a group of people who volunteer again and again for pharmaceutical trials and medical procedures.  They don’t have “real” jobs, but instead they go from place to place signing up for different pills and procedures so that they can make enough money to get by.  Sometimes they get the real medicine, and sometimes they get placebos.  They never know if the medicine they’re taking is real or fake.  Sometimes they have no idea until they start throwing up, or rashes appear on their bodies, or their hair starts falling out.  It’s not the safest way to make money, but being a human guinea pig is easier than working … at least it usually is.

Now, the problem with going through all these procedures and taking all these pills is that sometimes things start happening to your body and your mind … and you don’t know why.  If you start having blackouts and losing your memory, is it because of the pills you took on Monday, or that injection you got on Tuesday?  Or are you having blackouts for another reason that has nothing to do with medical tests?

Audie and her friend Charlotte each have their own reasons for wanting to earn extra money.  Charlotte wants extra money so she can afford to move away and start over in a new place.  And Audie wants extra money so that she can plan a surprise for her boyfriend’s birthday.  But to earn that money, they’re going to have to sign up for even more medical tests than before.  And with every new test, they put themselves at an even greater risk.

May cause vomiting.  May cause depression.  May cause death.

Booktalk: Crazy by Linda Vigen Phillips

Crazy cover

Crazy by Linda Vigen Phillips was one of my favorite teen books of 2014, and there are several facets of this book that make it unique.  It’s a poem-format novel, it’s historical fiction, and it tackles family problems in general and mental illness specifically.  Laura is a great protagonist, and readers will feel for her as she tries to deal with the normal hurdles of her teenage life while wondering if the mental illness in her family will prove to be the biggest hurdle of all.

BOOKTALK:

The year is 1963.  My name is Laura, I’m 15 years old, and I’m an artist like my mother.

My world is filled with plenty of good things, like my friends, Mrs. Grant my art teacher, Dennis Martin with his deep blue eyes and his gorgeous smile, American Bandstand on TV, and my Beach Boys records.

Unfortunately, my world is filled with lousy things, too.  Like how whenever I get embarrassed I get these big red splotches all over my neck and I can’t stop sweating.  Like the way I thought that Dennis Martin was going to ask me to take a ride in his new car, except he didn’t and now my friends think I’m a lost cause.  Like the way I think I might be going crazy.

I told you that I’m an artist like my mother.  That’s only partially true … or maybe it’s not true at all.  You see, my mother used to be a painter back when she was my age.  But then she stopped.  I still look at her paintings on the walls sometimes, and I wonder why she doesn’t do it anymore.  I wonder if the part of her brain that made the paintings is the same part that doesn’t always work the right way … and which seems to be getting worse.  I wonder if creating those paintings was a symptom of what was going wrong inside her head.  And I wonder if me being an artist like my mother means that I’ll go crazy, too.